Adding Extra Insulation To Your Loft Conversion

Having decided to remodel your loft and convert it into a bedroom, office or communal space, it is important to consider adding extra insulation to your loft to improve the overall efficiency of your home. With the temperatures dropping and energy prices higher, natural gas heating is no longer the cost advantage it once was. Sealing and insulating the “envelope” or “shell” of your home, its outer walls, ceiling, windows, doors, and floors, is often the most cost effective way to improve energy efficiency and comfort. Increasing your home energy efficiency will start reducing your monthly bills immediately on the completion of the installation.

One of the main culprits in heat loss is the loft.  Heat rises and if there is an inefficient amount of insulation or unprotected areas, much of your heat from your living space will be lost. Insulation keeps your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. You can greatly increase the energy efficiency and comfort of a home by installing insulation with an R-value higher than the minimum requirements. But to truly enjoy the benefits of insulation, it must be installed correctly. Compressing it or leaving gaps through which air can flow can cut insulation’s effectiveness in half. Better insulation isn’t just for winter. Homeowners can reduce their energy bills by up to 25% in the summer months, and almost 50% in the winter months simply by upgrading or retrofitting insulation into their homes.

Inspecting your loft for proper insulation depth and R-value, air leaks and ventilation will tell you if you need to add insulation or seal some air leaks.

Sealing Leaks

Air leaks and drafts are easy to find because they are easy to feel. Like those around windows and doors. But holes and gaps hidden in attics, basements, and crawlspaces are big energy wasters. Sealing these leaks with caulk, spray foam, or weather stripping will have a great impact on improving your comfort and reducing utility bills.

Insulation

Rolls and batts—or blankets—are flexible products made from mineral fibres, such as fiberglass and rock wool. They are available in widths suited to standard spacings of wall studs and loft or floor joists: 2×4 walls can hold R-13 or R-15 batts; 2×6 walls can have R-19 or R-21 products.

Loose-fill insulation—usually made of fiberglass, rock wool, or cellulose—comes in shreds, granules, or nodules. These small particles should be blown into spaces using special pneumatic equipment. The blown-in material conforms readily to building cavities and lofts. Therefore, loose-fill insulation is well suited for places where it is difficult to install other types of insulation.

Rigid foam insulation—foam insulation typically is more expensive than fiber insulation. But it’s very effective in buildings with space limitations and where higher R-values are needed. Foam insulation R-values range from R-4 to R-6.5 per inch of thickness (2.54 cm), which is up to 2 times greater than most other insulating materials of the same thickness.

Adding Insulation in your loft is pretty easy.  Loose-Fill insulation can be blown in without the need of a contractor. Purchasing from a hardware store is relatively inexpensive and many times you can also rent the blower from the same place you purchase the insulation.

Having decided to remodel your loft and convert it into a bedroom, office or communal space, it is important to consider adding extra insulation to your loft to improve the overall efficiency of your home. So what we’re essentially trying to say is that, if it is a home office that your loft has been converted into then before shifting your office furniture items around, think about insulation first!

 

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